Inspirational

A Prayer

Father, I ask you to bless my friends reading this right now. I am asking You to minister to their spirit at this very moment.

Where there is pain, give them Your peace and mercy.

Where there is self doubting, release a renewed confidence in Your ability to work through them.

Where there is tiredness, or exhaustion, I ask You to give them understanding, patience, and strength as they learn submission to Your leading.

Where there is spiritual stagnation, I ask You to renew them by revealing Your nearness, and by drawing them into greater intimacy with You.

Where there is fear, reveal Your love, and release to them Your courage.

Where there is a sin blocking them, reveal it, and break its hold over my friend's life.

Bless their finances, give them greater vision, and raise up leaders, and friends to support, and encourage them.

Give each of them discernment to recognise the evil forces around them, and reveal to them the power they have in You to defeat it.

I ask You to do these things in Jesus' name.

Passing this on to anyone you consider a friend will bless you both.
Passing this on to one not considered a friend is something Christ would do.

Author unknown


Perfection

In Brooklyn, New York, Shush is a school that caters to learning disabled children. Some children remain in Shush for their entire school career, while others can be mainstreamed into conventional schools. At a Shush fundraising dinner, the father of a Shush child delivered a speech that would never be forgotten by all who attended.

After extolling the school and its dedicated staff, he cried out, "Where is the perfection in my son Shaya? Everything God does is done with perfection. But my child cannot understand things as other children do. My child cannot remember facts and figures as other children do.

Where is God's perfection?"

The audience was shocked by the question, pained by the father's anguish and stilled by the piercing query. " I believe," the father answered, "that when God brings a child like this into the world, the perfection that he seeks is in the way people react to this child."

He then told the following story about his son Shaya: One afternoon Shaya and his father walked past a park where some boys Shaya knew were playing baseball. Shaya asked, "Do you think they will let me play?" Shaya's father knew that his son was not at all athletic and that most boys would not want him on their team. But Shaya's father understood that if his son was chosen to play it would give him a comfortable sense of belonging.

Shaya's father approached one of the boys in the field and asked if Shaya could play. The boy looked around for guidance from his teammates. Getting none, he took matters into his own hands and said "We are losing by six runs and the game is in the eighth inning. I guess he can be on our team and we'll try to put him up to bat in the ninth inning."

Shaya's father was ecstatic as Shaya smiled broadly. Shaya was told to put on a glove and go out to play short center field. In the bottom of the eighth inning, Shaya's team scored a few runs but was still behind by three. In the bottom of the ninth inning, Shaya's team scored again and now with two outs and the bases loaded with the potential winning run on base, Shaya was scheduled to be up.Would the team actually let Shaya bat at this juncture and give away their chance to win the game?

Surprisingly, Shaya was given the bat. Everyone knew that it was all but impossible because Shaya didn't even know how to hold the bat properly, let alone hit with it. However as Shaya stepped up to the plate, the pitcher moved a few steps to lob the ball in softly so Shaya should at least be able to make contact.

The first pitch came in and Shaya swung clumsily and missed. One of Shaya's teammates came up to Shaya and together they held the bat and faced the pitcher waiting for the next pitch. The pitcher again took a few steps forward to toss the ball softly toward Shaya. As the pitch came in, Shaya and his teammate swung at the bat and together they hit a slow ground ball to the pitcher. The pitcher picked up the soft grounder and could easily have thrown the ball to the first baseman. Shaya would have been out and that would have ended the game.

Instead, the pitcher took the ball and threw it on a high arc to right field, far beyond reach of the first baseman. Everyone started yelling, "Shaya, run to first. Run to first." Never in his life had Shaya run to first. He scampered down the baseline wide-eyed and startled. By the time he reached first base, the right fielder had the ball. He could have thrown the ball to the second baseman who would tag out Shaya, who was still running.

But the right fielder understood what the pitcher's intentions were, so he threw the ball high and far over the third baseman's head. Everyone yelled, "Run to second, run to second." Shaya ran towards second base as the runners ahead of him deliriously circled the bases towards home. As Shaya reached second base, the opposing short stop ran to him, turned him in the direction of third base and shouted, "Run to third."

As Shaya rounded third, the boys from both teams ran behind him screaming, "Shaya run home." Shaya ran home, stepped on home plate and all 18 boys lifted him on their shoulders and made him the hero, as he had just hit a "grand slam" and won the game for his team.

"That day," said the father softly with tears now rolling down his face, "those 18 boys reached their level of God's perfection."

Horace Edwards

I Asked God....

I asked God to take away my pain.
God said, No.
It is not for me to take away, but for you to give it up.

I asked God to make my handicapped child whole.
God said, No.
Her spirit was whole, her body was only temporary.

I asked God to grant me patience.
God said, No.
Patience is a by-product of tribulations; it isn't granted, it is earned.

I asked God to give me happiness.
God said, No.
I give you blessings. Happiness is up to you.

I asked God to spare me pain.
God said, No.
Suffering draws you apart from worldly cares and brings you closer to me.

I asked God to make my spirit grow.
God said, No.
You must grow on your own, but I will prune you to make you fruitful.

I asked for all things that I might enjoy life.
God said, No.
I will give you life so that you may enjoy all things.

I ask God to help me LOVE others, as much as he loves me.
God said...
Ahhhh, finally you have the idea.

Anonymous


Our deepest fear ...

Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure.
It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us.
We ask ourselves, who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, and fabulous?
Actually, who are you not to be?
You are a child of God. You playing small doesn't serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking, so other people won't feel insecure around you.
We were born to make manifest the glory of God within us.
It is not just in some of us; it's in everyone. And, as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same.
As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.

From a speech given at the inauguration of former Republic of South Africa President Nelson Mandela, in 1994


What truly matters ...

A few years ago at the Spokane, Washington Special Olympics, contestants, all physically or mentally disabled, assembled at the starting line for the 100-yard dash. At the gun, they all started out, not exactly in a dash, but with a relish to run the race to the finish and win.
All, that is, except one boy who stumbled on the asphalt, tumbled over a couple of times and began to cry. The others heard the boy cry. Some of them slowed down and looked back. They turned around and went back.
One girl with Down's Syndrome bent down and kissed him and said "This will make it better". They linked arms and walked across the finish line together. Everyone in the stadium stood, and the cheering went on for several minutes. People who were there are still telling this story. Why?

Because deep down we know this one thing:
What matters in life is more than winning for ourselves. What truly matters in this life is helping others win, even if it means slowing down and changing our course.



In January 2013, Fernández Anaya was trailing behind Olympic bronze medallist Abel Mutai during a cross-country race in Burlada, Navarra. Mutai was leading comfortably until he pulled up 10 to 20 metres short of the finish line thinking the race was already over. Instead of passing Mutai, Fernández Anaya slowed down and told Mutai to keep running. Since they didn't speak a common language, the Basque runner gestured frantically at Mutai who went on to win the race.

"I didn't deserve to win it," Fernández Anaya told El País. "I did what I had to do. He was the rightful winner. He created a gap that I couldn't have closed if he hadn't made a mistake. As soon as I saw he was stopping, I knew I wasn't going to pass him."

Fernández Anaya's actions may not have earned him the win, but they did earn him many new fans.


I've learned ...

I've learned that I like my teacher because she cries when we sing "Silent Night"...............
Age 6
I've learned that you can't hide a piece of broccoli in a glass of milk.............. Age 7
I've learned that when I wave to people in the country, they stop what they are doing and wave back.............. Age 9
I've learned that just when I get my room the way I like it, Mom makes me clean it up.............. Age 13
I've learned that if you want to cheer yourself up, you should try cheering someone else up.............. Age 14
I've learned that although it's hard to admit it, I'm secretly glad my parents are strict with me.......... Age 15
I've learned that silent company is often more healing than words of advice............... Age 24
I've learned that brushing my child's hair is one of life's great pleasures............... Age 26
I've learned that wherever I go, the world's worst drivers have followed me there............... Age 29
I've learned that if someone says something unkind about me, I must live so that no one will believe it........ Age 39
I've learned that there are people who love you dearly but just don't know how to show it .......... Age 41
I've learned that you can make some one's day by simply sending them a little card.............. Age 44
I've learned that the greater a person's sense of guilt, the greater his need to cast blame on others................ Age 46
I've learned that children and grandparents are natural allies................ Age 47
I've learned that singing "Amazing Grace" can lift my spirits for hours................ Age 49
I've learned that motel mattresses are better on the side away from the phone................ Age 50
I've learned that you can tell a lot about a man by the way he handles these three things: a rainy day, lost luggage, and tangled Christmas tree lights................ Age 51
I've learned that keeping a vegetable garden is worth a medicine cabinet full of pills.......... Age 52
I've learned that regardless of your relationship with your parents, you miss them terribly after they die........ Age 53
I've learned that making a living is not the same thing as making a life................. Age 58
I've learned that if you want to do something positive for your children, try to improve your marriage................. Age 61
I've learned that life sometimes gives you a second chance......... Age 62
I've learned that you shouldn't go through life with a catchers mitt on both hands. You need to be able to throw something back....... Age 64
I've learned that if you pursue happiness, it will elude you. But if you focus on your family, the needs of others, your work, meeting new people, and doing the very best you can, happiness will find you.......... Age 65
I've learned that whenever I decide something with kindness, I usually make the right decision........... Age 66
I've learned that everyone can use a prayer................ Age 72
I've learned that it pays to believe in miracles. And to tell the truth, I've seen several.............. Age 73
I've learned that even when I have pains, I don't have to be one ................ Age 82
I've learned that every day you should reach out and touch someone. People love that human touch - holding hands, a warm hug, or just a friendly pat on the back... .... Age 85
I've learned that I still have a lot to learn.............. Age 92

I've learned that you should pass this on to someone you care about. Sometimes they just need a little something to make them smile.

Marty Civin Spencer,
Massachusetts

 

The Master's Hand

Seizing the opportunity to explore the wonders of the concert hall, the little boy rose and eventually explored his way through a door marked "NO ADMITTANCE."
When the house lights dimmed and the concert was about to begin, the mother returned to her seat and discovered that the child was missing.
Suddenly, the curtains parted and spotlights focused on the impressive Steinway on stage. In horror, the mother saw her little boy sitting at the keyboard, innocently picking out "Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star."
At that moment, the great piano master made his entrance, quickly moved to the piano,and whispered in the boy's ear, "Don't quit. Keep playing." Then leaning over, Paderewski reached down with his left hand and began filling in a bass part. Soon his right arm reached around to the other side of the child and he added a running obligato. Together, the old master and the young novice transformed a frightening situation into a wonderfully creative experience. The audience was mesmerized.

Whatever our situation in life and history - however outrageous, however desperate, whatever dry spell of the spirit, whatever dark night of the soul - God is whispering deep within our beings; "Don't quit. Keep playing. You are not alone, together we will transform the broken tatters into a masterwork of my creative art. Together, we will mesmerize the world with our song of peace.

J.L. Read


A Child learns ....

If a child lives with criticism, he learns to condem.
If a child lives with hostility, she learns to fight.
If a child lives with ridicule, he learns to be shy.
If a child lives with shame, she learns to feel guilty.

If a child lives with tolerance, he learns to be patient.
If a child lives with encouragement, she learns confidence.
If a child lives with praise, he learns to appreciate.
If a child lives with fairness, she learns justice.
If a child lives with security, he learns to have faith.
If a child lives with approval, she learns to like herself.
If a child lives with acceptance and friendship, he learns to find love in the world.

Dorothy Law Holte


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